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Category Archives: Breads, Muffins & Rolls

Another Sourdough Win!

I’m now two months into this sourdough adventure, and life with Fester is going fairly smoothly. I haven’t forgotten to feed him (yet), although I do have him down to just one meal every week. Three cheers for low-maintenance “pets.” (And this why we don’t have a dog. Or houseplants.) 

So far, I haven’t had to actually “discard” any of the starter when it’s time to feed Fester. Most of it has wound up in cinnamon raisin bread and pizza dough. Last weekend, however, I didn’t have time to make anything with the discard. I couldn’t bring myself to toss out the half cup or so of starter though, so I put it in a container and stuffed it back in the refrigerator. I figured I’d find something to do with it after the weekend, even if that meant eating pizza again. (Not that anyone here complains about pizza.) 

I remembered that Karen had sent me a link for sourdough biscuits with cheese and chives in them, so I went looking for that recipe. While I didn’t find her original link, I stumbled on a recipe for caramelized onion sourdough biscuits from King Arthur Flour. I didn’t have chives on hand, but I figured a scallion would be an acceptable substitute.

The biscuits were pretty easy to put together. I started caramelizing the onions as soon as I got home from work, and while those were hanging out on the stove, I chopped the scallion and mixed up the rest of the ingredients. The recipe said to let the caramelized onions chill for three hours, but that meant we’d be eating biscuits at 9 p.m. So, I did what any short-on-time cook would do: I put them in the freezer for 15 minutes instead.

When I added the starter to the dry ingredients, it didn’t seem to have enough moisture to hold the dough together. So, I added a splash (probably less than a tablespoon) of half-and-half to the dough to bring everything together. If my sourdough starter was thinner, I probably wouldn’t have needed it, but my starter seems to be on the thicker side.

These smelled incredible while they were baking, and they were easily our favorite part of dinner. At the rate I’m going, I’ll have more uses for discarded starter than for “fed” starter!

SourdoughOnionBiscuits

Caramelized Onion Sourdough Biscuits

1 medium onion, peeled and thinly sliced
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon brown sugar
4 1/4 ounces (1 cup) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
4 ounces (1 stick) unsalted butter, cold
1 scallion, finely chopped
9 ounces (1 cup) unfed sourdough starter
half-and-half, optional

Heat a large skillet (I love my cast iron for this!) over medium-low heat. Place the onion, brown sugar and one tablespoon of butter in the skillet. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft and caramelized, which should take about 30 minutes. Remove the onions from the skillet and place them in a small bowl. Allow the bowl to cool in the refrigerator or freezer until the onions are thoroughly chilled. (This took about 15 minutes in my freezer.) 

Preheat the oven to 425° and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a baking mat.

While the onions are cooking / chilling, whisk the flour, baking powder and salt together in a large bowl. Use a pastry cutter to cut the butter into the flour mixture until the mixture is crumbly. Stir the chopped scallions into the mixture, and then add the chilled onions.

Stir the sourdough starter into the bowl and use a rubber spatula to gently work the starter into the flour-butter-onion mixture. (If the mixture is too dry after the starter is fully incorporated, add a tiny splash of half-and-half to help things come together.) Turn the dough out onto a well-floured work surface and gently pat into a 1″ thick disc.

Use a 2-1/2″ or 3″ biscuit cutter to cut the dough into rounds. Pat any leftover scraps together to cut out additional biscuits. Place the rounds about 2″ apart on the prepared baking sheet.

Bake until golden brown, about 15-18 minutes. Remove from oven and serve warm.

Yield: I got nine 3″ biscuits out of the recipe; King Arthur Flour says eight. No one’s complaining about an extra biscuit here.

Note: I haven’t tried this, but I think these would freeze well before baking. I’d make the dough and cut out the biscuits, and then put them in the freezer on baking sheet lined with waxed paper. When they’re frozen solid, transfer them to a Ziploc bag. Then you should be able to just bake them straight from the freezer whenever you need biscuits.  

From King Arthur Flour

Click here for a printable version.

 
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Posted by on March 21, 2017 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls

 

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Perfect Bread

Like I mentioned earlier, one of my goals for this year is to bake more bread. And thanks to Karen’s generosity, I’m all set to scratch sourdough off my baking bucket list. I started feeding Fester last week, and he’s been a happy part of our family ever since. I even felt some guilt when I moved him from his warm spot next to my KitchenAid mixer to the fridge. (Side note: All credit for the name “Fester” goes to Karen’s husband, Arron.) 

My one hang-up with the sourdough process is the “discard” step. After four days of gradual feeding, the instructions said to reduce the starter down to just 1/2 a cup, feed that portion and then discard the rest. And I have to discard starter whenever I feed Fester from here on out! This goes against my thrifty nature! Not to mention the fact that I’m lovingly feeding him on a regular basis (which is more than I can say about the plant in my office…). Why would I want to throw some of it out?

So I’ve been searching the internet for things to do with “discarded” starter. Thankfully, King Arthur Flour has some great ideas and recipes. After reading several recipes, I decided to start with this cinnamon raisin swirl bread. I had everything on hand for them (unlike these delicious-sounding English muffins).

It took a few hours to make the bread, but most of that was hands-off time while the dough rose. And making the dough couldn’t have been any easier. I literally dumped it into the mixer and let the dough hook do the work. I was a little concerned when that the dough was going to be too soft and sticky to work with, but I rolled it out on a greased pastry mat and didn’t really have a problem.

I’m just a week into this sourdough / bread baking adventure, but if my first experience is any indication, this is going to be a tasty ride.

cinnamonraisinsourdough

Cinnamon Raisin Swirl Sourdough Bread

Note: I’ve been loving measuring by weight instead of volume (fewer dishes! improved accuracy!) lately, so I’m giving this recipe in weights. The good people at King Arthur Flour also provide standard volume measurements, so feel free to click over there if you need things in cups. 🙂

For the dough:
4 ounces of sourdough starter, fed or unfed
12 3/4 ounces all-purpose flour
2 1/2 teaspoons yeast (KA calls for instant; I used the active dry that I always have on hand.) 
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 large egg
2 1/2 ounces softened butter
5 3/8 ounces lukewarm water

For the filling: 
1 3/4 ounces sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
1 large egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon water
2 5/8 ounces raisins

extra butter for finishing, optional

To make the dough, combine all of the dough ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Turn the mixer on to medium-low speed and mix until the dough comes together, then increase the speed to medium and knead until a soft, smooth dough forms.

Place the dough in a lightly greased large bowl (I used my 8-cup Pyrex bowl.) and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough sit until it has doubled in size, about 1-1/2  to 2 hours.

While the dough rises, stir the sugar, cinnamon and flour together in a small bowl. Set aside.

Lightly grease your counter (or a pastry mat), and then turn the dough out onto the prepared work surface. Gently deflate the dough, and then roll / pat it into a rectangle that’s about 6″ x 20″.

Brush the surface of the dough with the egg wash, then spread the cinnamon-sugar mixture over the dough. Sprinkle the raisins evenly over the surface of the dough.

Working from one of the short ends of the dough, roll the dough into a log. Pinch the ends closed to seal the log, and make sure the long seam is pinched closed.

Transfer the dough log into a greased 9″ x 5″ loaf pan. Cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rise until it is about 1″ above the edge of the loaf pan.

While the dough is rising, preheat the oven to 350°. When the dough is done rising, bake the bread for 40-45 minutes, or until the interior of the loaf measures 190° on a digital thermometer and the top is golden brown. Tent the bread with aluminum foil after the first 20 minutes to prevent the top from becoming too brown.

Remove the bread from the oven and run a knife along the edges of the pan to loosen the bread. Turn the bread out of the pan and brush the top with extra butter, if desired. (This gives the bread a soft, satiny crust.) Allow bread to cool before slicing.

From King Arthur Flour

Click here for a printable version.

 
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Posted by on February 3, 2017 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls

 

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My Go-To Blueberry Muffins

I have been all about fast breakfasts lately. I don’t know if I’m getting lazier or if we’re getting busier, but there seems to be less time in the mornings around here. OK, so maybe that has something to do with chilly mornings and my desire to hit “snooze” as many times as possible before getting out of bed, but still. There just isn’t always enough time for a bowl of oatmeal before work.

Even on my busiest days though, I still need some sort of fuel in the mornings. I can be somewhat unpleasant when I’m hungry. (Andy will vouch for this. Hangry Beth = no good to anyone.) Enter muffins. They’re portable. They taste good either at room temperature or warmed up, and honestly, the flavor combinations are almost endless. (Don’t believe me? You should see Kirsten’s list.)

Blueberry muffins are one of my favorite kinds, and they’re one of the easiest ones to put together, at least in my opinion. You don’t have to peel or chop the fruit, and odds are, all of the ingredients are hanging out in your pantry/fridge/freezer right now.

These are great with fresh blueberries, but they work just as well with frozen blueberries, which is helpful when a). it’s not blueberry season and b). you froze several pounds of blueberries last July. And like I heard last night on Cook’s Country: “Frozen fruit is always in season.” (Yes, I watch PBS, and I’m not ashamed to admit it.) 

I swap about one-third to one-half of the all-purpose flour for whole wheat pie and pastry flour, since this is breakfast, not dessert. I go heavy on the blueberries, since we’re kind of addicted to fruit around here. Finally, I add the lemon zest to the sugar and give it a spin in the mixer before creaming the butter and sugar together. I feel like that gives the muffins a better lemon flavor. Of course, that could all be in my head, since I get a big whiff of fresh lemon while I’m working.

I’ll admit that these are best fresh, straight out of the oven, but they keep fairly well in an airtight container for the few days that it takes us to polish off a batch. And since nine muffins just won’t cut it at our house, I always double the recipe, which are the amounts reflected below. That way, we have breakfast (and snacks) for the entire week, which means I can hit snooze one more time. Again. 😉

Blueberry Muffins

Blueberry Muffins

1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
10 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
2 large eggs
1 1/2 cups Greek yogurt
3 cups AP flour (can substitute up to half with whole wheat pie and pastry flour)
3 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
heavy 1 1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries (If using frozen blueberries, do not thaw them beforehand.)

Preheat the oven to 375° and line a muffin tin with paper liners. (Alternatively, you could spray the tins with cooking spray, but that never works well for me. Besides, paper liners are so cute!) 

In a medium bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients, then set them aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the sugar and lemon zest. Mix on medium-low speed for a few minutes, or until the zest has been evenly distributed throughout the sugar and smells lemony. Add the butter and cream together until the mixture is light and fluffy.

Add the eggs and beat well, then add the yogurt. Sift about half of the dry ingredient mixture over the batter and mix on low speed until just combined. Sift the rest of the dry ingredients into the batter and mix until the flour has almost disappeared.

Add the blueberries to the bowl and gently fold them in to the batter, which will be very thick. Make sure that the flour is fully incorporated into the batter when you’re done adding the blueberries.

Using a cookie scoop (or two spoons, if the spring on your scoop breaks halfway through the process…), fill the muffin cups about 3/4 of the way full. Bake until golden brown and the muffins test clean with a toothpick, about 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack. Store in an airtight container.

Yield: Approximately 18-20 muffins

From Smitten Kitchen, who adapted it from Cook’s Illustrated

Click here for a printable version.

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2016 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls, Breakfast

 

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Apple Butter In My Muffins

A couple of years ago, I started using the crockpot to make apple butter. It was an easy solution for the hundreds of apples we brought home from the orchard, and it makes the house smell incredible. Plus, it cooks while I sleep, and then I store the apple butter in the freezer. That’s a win-win in my world.

My apple butter usually winds up on biscuits or in baked brie, but when Andy requested muffins for a work potluck, I decided to see if anyone had ever put apple butter in the muffins before they baked, rather than on the muffins afterwards.

A few seconds later, Google came back with more than four million results. (Further proof that there’s nothing new left under the sun.) After skimming the first few items (does anyone really get past the first page of search results?), I narrowed it down to two choices. And from there, I simply went with the one that had the streusel topping. Although, I would have preferred a recipe that had the apple butter mixed into the batter, instead of spooned into the center. Maybe I’ll experiment with that someday.

Like any good muffin recipe, these came together quickly and easily. After all, if I’m going to spend hours in the kitchen, I’m going to make something fancier than muffins. I decided to skip the glaze (mostly because I was feeling lazy), and while I’m sure it would be fantastic, you can’t miss what you don’t know. The muffin itself isn’t overly sweet, but the apple butter and the streusel make up for it. And then I don’t feel like I’m completing negating my evening bike ride by eating one. (Please don’t tell me if that’s not true, OK? Ignorance is bliss.) 😉

AppleButterMuffins

 

Apple Butter Muffins
Makes about 16 standard-sized muffins

For the muffins: 
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt.
1 egg
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup apple butter (I didn’t actually measure this out. I just scooped spoonfuls from the jar.) 

For the streusel topping:
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup walnuts
4 tablespoons unsalted butter

Preheat the oven to 425. Line a muffin pan with liners and set aside.

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon and salt together in a small bowl. Whisk to combine.

In a large bowl, beat the egg, milk and vegetable oil together until combined. Add the dry ingredients to the egg mixture and gently mix until the ingredients are just combined. (Don’t overmix!) 

To make the topping, use your now-empty dry-ingredients bowl and stir the flour, cinnamon, brown sugar walnuts together. Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter until the mixture is well-blended.

Place a heaping teaspoon of the muffin batter in the bottom of the prepared muffin cups, and then place a heaping teaspoon of apple butter on top of the muffin batter. Sprinkle a hearty pinch of streusel on top of the apple butter, and then top the streusel with another heaping teaspoon of batter. When all of the muffin cups are filled and the batter is gone, top the muffins with the remaining streusel.

Bake at 425 degrees for 5 minutes, then reduce the temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for another 15 minutes, or until muffins are golden brown and test done with a toothpick. Remove the muffins from the oven and allow them to cool on a wire rack before serving.

From Tastes of Lizzy T’s

Click here for a printable version.

 
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Posted by on May 6, 2015 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls

 

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Real Bread

Get this: I finally made real bread. I mean, I’ve baked bread before (both quick breads and sandwich breads), but they were nothing like this. I’m talking about bread with a perfect chewy crust and an interior that’s both studded with bacon AND filled with those fun little holes you find in fancy bakery bread. This stuff may have been the highlight of my weekend last week. (And that’s saying something, considering that I was going to tell you about the chocolate-Irish cream cookies that were in our cookie jar…) 

I’ve been tempted by the idea of a no-knead bread for a while now (ever since I started following King Arthur Flour on Facebook), and when the link to this recipe popped up in my feed, I knew that there was no going back. Never mind that I’d have to make a trip to the store to buy bread flour. This was happening. I did a little reading (again, thanks to KAF) about no-knead bread and decided that this was what weekends were made for.

I mixed up the flour, salt, water and yeast on Saturday afternoon, and since I didn’t feel like baking bread at 3 in the morning (reason #5,872 why I don’t work at a bakery), I let it sit until late Sunday afternoon. It was incredibly easy to put together too – mix, cover, rest and bake. The original recipe called for 8 ounces of bacon, and while I’m sure that would have been amazing, I had to work with what was in my fridge.

I was surprised by how little the bread appeared to rise overnight in the refrigerator, which made me a little concerned when I went to bake it Sunday. Thankfully, after 90 minutes of “resting,” and 45 minutes in a screaming hot oven, I was rewarded with the prettiest loaf of bread to come out of my oven. Seriously. It was round and crusty and perfect. We cheated on the cooling time and cut into it after it had been out of the oven for 30 minutes, rather than an entire hour.

Mmm. At the risk of sounding redundant, it was SO good. I’m sure it’d be a great foundation for a grilled cheese, or the perfect partner to a bowl of soup, but it didn’t last long enough for that around here. Maybe next time. Because there WILL be a next time. 🙂

No-Knead Bacon Bread

No-Knead Bacon Bread 

3 cups bread flour, plus extra for the mat
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 cup and 6 tablespoons warm water
2 tablespoons minced fresh chives
4 slices of bacon, cooked until crisp
freshly ground black pepper
olive oil, for the mat

In a large bowl, mix together the flour, yeast, salt and water. Stir until the mixture is combined. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours. (I let mine rest for about 26 hours.)  

When you’re ready to bake the bread, remove it from the refrigerator and sprinkle the bacon and chives on the dough. Add a few generous grinds of black pepper, and then stir until the mix-ins are incorporated.

Next, spread a clean cotton kitchen towel on the counter and place a pastry mat or sheet of parchment paper on top of the towel. Lightly brush the mat with a thin layer of olive oil, and then spread a generous layer of flour (I used about a scant 1/3 cup.) on top of the oiled surface. Scrape the dough from the bowl and shape into a round loaf on the prepared surface. Generously dust the top of the loaf with another coating of flour. Lightly oil another piece of parchment paper and place it, oiled side down, on top of the bread dough. Cover the parchment paper with another cotton kitchen towel. Let the dough rest for 90 minutes.

During the last 30 minutes of resting, preheat your oven to 450 degrees. While the oven is preheating, place an oven-safe Dutch oven (love my Lodge!) in the oven to heat as well. When the 90 minutes is up, remove the Dutch oven from the oven and take the lid off of the pot. Remove the parchment paper and towel from the top of the loaf and carefully flip the dough into the preheated Dutch oven. Place the lid on the Dutch oven and return it to the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove the lid from the Dutch oven and bake for another 15-20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown. Remove the pan from the oven. After a few minutes, use a pair of tongs to pick up the bread and place it on a wire rack to cool. Allow the bread to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing and serving.

From My Name is Yeh

Click here for a printable version.

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2015 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls

 

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Cooking Club Win!

The theme for our most recent “cooking club” evening was appetizers, which meant that I had lots of possible recipes to chose from. There’s the avocado feta hummus. Or the avocado lemon feta dip. Or the sweet potato discs with pecans and cranberries (and since I’m not crazy about goat cheese, I’d swap it out for, you guessed it, feta). And those are just the recent additions to the list.

Thanks to some crazy schedules (and some last-minute planning), I knew I didn’t have time to fit in a stop to buy avocado, feta, or sweet potatoes. So I decided that bread could be an appetizer. I mean, you eat it while you wait for your meal to come at a fancy restaurant, right? (OK, so maybe that’s fancy bread that you dip in balsamic and olive oil, but just go with me on this, mmmk?)

What we have here is a cheesy, bacony loaf of deliciousness. It smelled fantastic while it was baking, and it tasted good too. (It had cheese and bacon. How could it not??) Its’a quick bread, which meant no monkeying around yeast and letting the dough rise. It was good on its own, and it wasn’t bad with apple butter either.

I have to admit, the directions for this one weirded me out just a bit. Pour the melted butter in the bottom of the loaf pan? Add the dough and pour the bacon grease on top? I was convinced that I was going to end up with a greasy, soggy mess. But amazing things must have happened inside my oven, because the finished product wasn’t greasy OR soggy.

Amazing things indeed. After all, we’re talking about bacon, cheese and beer. In bread. The finished product didn’t last long at all.
Bacon Beer Cheese BreadBacon Beer Cheese Bread

6-7 slices of bacon, cooked until crisp and crumbled, drippings reserved (The original recipe called for 6 thick slices, but my bacon was on the thin side, so I went with 7.) 
3 cups of all-purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 ounces shredded cheddar cheese
1 12-ounce bottle of beer
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 tablespoons reserved bacon grease

Preheat oven to 350. Butter a 9″ x 5″ loaf pan.

Stir the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt together in a large mixing bowl. Add the cheese and crumbled bacon and stir to combine. When the cheese and bacon are evenly mixed into the flour, pour the beer into the bowl. Stir the mixture with a large spoon until it comes together.

Spoon/pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan. Spread it evenly in the pan and drizzle the melted butter and bacon grease over the top of the loaf.

Bake until a knife inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean, about 50-60 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and allow it to cool on a wire rack. After 10-15 minutes, you can flip the loaf out of the pan.

Slice and serve. Cover leftovers (what?) with plastic wrap and store at room temperature.

From Brown Eyed Baker, who adapted it from the Novice Chef

Click here for a printable version.

 

 
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Posted by on May 17, 2014 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls

 

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My Kind of Pumpkin

I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t go nuts over pumpkin. I don’t rush to Starbucks each September for a pumpkin spice latte. I’ve been known to bypass the pumpkin pie in favor of other goodies at Thanksgiving, and while I’ll eat a piece of pumpkin roll or a pumpkin square, I don’t hide the fact that for me, those goodies are all about the frosting/filling.

We did, however, receive a couple of pie pumpkins at the end of our CSA, and since I wasn’t ready to make pie, I roasted them (per Annie’s method) and froze the puree. I figured I’d find a use for it sooner or later! I stumbled on a muffin recipe over at Smitten Kitchen, and, in spite of my ambivalence toward most things pumpkin, I will be the first to admit that these are a keeper.

First of all, they’re incredibly easy to make. In my mind, muffins should be quick and easy. If I want a breakfast with multiple steps, I’ll make cinnamon rolls or something. Since I upped the amount of pumpkin in the recipe, I figured I could also add some oatmeal (these ARE muffins, after all, not cupcakes). They’re nice and moist (thanks to all of that pumpkin!), and they go well with the handful of mini chocolate chips that just happened to find their way into the mixing bowl. 🙂

PumpkinMuffins

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

1 1/2 cups flour (I used a combination of white whole wheat, whole wheat pastry flour and regular all-purpose flour)
scant 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 lb. pumpkin puree (Deb’s recipe calls for 1 1/3 cups of puree, which is what I used the first time I made these. The second time, I discovered that there was just a little left in the freezer bag, so I added it all.) 
1/3 cup canola oil
2 large eggs
1 1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup mini chocolate chips
cinnamon-sugar, for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line muffin cups with paper liners. (I got 24 mini-muffins and then another 10 or so regular-sized muffins out of one batch.) 

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, baking powder, baking soda, salt and pumpkin pie spice. Set aside.

Mix the pumpkin, oil, eggs and sugar together in a large bowl. Add the dry ingredients to the bowl with the pumpkin mixture and gently stir until almost combined. Pour the chocolate chips into the bowl and stir the batter a couple more times, until the chips are incorporated and the flour is all mixed into the batter.

Divide the mixture between the prepared muffin cups, filling them about two-thirds of the way full. Sprinkle the top of each muffin with cinnamon sugar. Bake until muffins test done with a toothpick, about 22 minutes. (I start checking them around 18 minutes or so.) Remove from the oven and let cool in the pan for about 5 minutes, then let muffins cool completely on a wire rack.

Adapted from Smitten Kitchen, who got the recipe from the American Club in Kohler, Wisconsin, via Gourmet magazine

Click here for a printable version.

 
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Posted by on January 26, 2014 in Breads, Muffins & Rolls

 

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